Sharp as Teeth and Stars

I was born blown minded with an eye on oblivion

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AIM = SomaCherub

Sun Sep 14
shoeboxtony:

Adolph Gottlieb. Mist. 1961. Guggenheim Museum

shoeboxtony:

Adolph Gottlieb. Mist. 1961. Guggenheim Museum

(via unfetteredeternalnow)

Neil Gaiman and Tori Amos: Comic Connections

Neil Gaiman and Tori Amos discussing comics, mythology, creativity, and collaboration after 23 years of friendship at the The British Library

"Sandman is weird ways came out of being friends with you."

This person, this self, this me, finally, was made somewhere else. Everything had come from somewhere else, and it would all go somewhere else. I was nothing but a pathway for the person known as me. Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (via wordsnquotes)

(via stickydrosera)

Sat Sep 13
But the same thing is also sought in other places- in caves, in labyrinths, in the desert where the tempter lives. To those who can divine its symbols a tremendous life force inhabits all things and places. Moses strikes his staff on the rock and the water of life spurts forth. A moment like this suffices for millenia.
All this only seems to have been given in remote places and times. In reality, it is concealed in every individual, entrusted to him in code, so that he might understand himself, in his deepest, supra-individual power. This is the goal of every teaching that is worthy of the name. Let matter condense into veritable walls that seem to block all prospects: yet the abundance is closest at hand, for it lives in man as a gift, as a time-transcending patrimony. It is up to him how he will grasp the staff: to merely support him on his life path, or to serve him as a scepter.
  Ernst Junger The Forest Passage, p.47 (via vulturehooligan)

(Source: loyaltyismightierthanfire, via theframedmaelstrom)

artslant:

David Bowie Is: Star Power – An Interview with Michael Darling
by Thea Liberty Nichols


David Bowie Is, coming to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in just a few weeks, is unprecedented to the extent that it is the first massive solo show the MCA has ever given to a musician. But as James W. Alsdorf Chief Curator Michael Darling discusses below, he was drawn to the exhibition because Bowie emulates the blending of media, the crossing over of disciplines he finds so relevant to contemporary artists’ practices.
Darling was kind enough to sit down with me this month and explain how the globe–trotting blockbuster will be articulated by the MCA. In addition, he outlines an MCA permanent collection exhibition they are putting together to coincide with the show, entitled Body Doubles, which both directly and indirectly fleshes out some of the more complex themes that emerge in Bowie, citing gender fluidity in particular.
Perhaps the centrality of outer space to many of Bowie’s works and personae will find a warm welcome in Chicago, given the Afro-Futurist bedrock that under-appreciated artists like Sun Ra have cultivated and Cauleen Smith have mined. Just as Bowie is a crossover artist, there is the hope that the Bowie show will have crossover appeal by bringing non-art, and potentially even non–museum going, audiences through the MCA’s doors. In many ways, David Bowie Is is momentous for that reason as well—it marks a sea change at the MCA, and represents the first of several soon-to-be-announced exhibitions that Darling has in the works, highlighting unexpected makers in boundary blurring shows.
Continue Reading…. 


This is a perfect convergence of my interests.

artslant:

David Bowie Is: Star Power – An Interview with Michael Darling

by Thea Liberty Nichols

David Bowie Is, coming to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in just a few weeks, is unprecedented to the extent that it is the first massive solo show the MCA has ever given to a musician. But as James W. Alsdorf Chief Curator Michael Darling discusses below, he was drawn to the exhibition because Bowie emulates the blending of media, the crossing over of disciplines he finds so relevant to contemporary artists’ practices.

Darling was kind enough to sit down with me this month and explain how the globe–trotting blockbuster will be articulated by the MCA. In addition, he outlines an MCA permanent collection exhibition they are putting together to coincide with the show, entitled Body Doubles, which both directly and indirectly fleshes out some of the more complex themes that emerge in Bowie, citing gender fluidity in particular.

Perhaps the centrality of outer space to many of Bowie’s works and personae will find a warm welcome in Chicago, given the Afro-Futurist bedrock that under-appreciated artists like Sun Ra have cultivated and Cauleen Smith have mined. Just as Bowie is a crossover artist, there is the hope that the Bowie show will have crossover appeal by bringing non-art, and potentially even non–museum going, audiences through the MCA’s doors. In many ways, David Bowie Is is momentous for that reason as well—it marks a sea change at the MCA, and represents the first of several soon-to-be-announced exhibitions that Darling has in the works, highlighting unexpected makers in boundary blurring shows.

Continue Reading…. 

This is a perfect convergence of my interests.

(via builtfordistance)

Fri Sep 12
aqqindex:

Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo, Offices, 1967

I lived about 10 minutes away from “The Pyramids” as they were called locally throughout elementary and middle school.  I never conceived of them as anything other than strange office buildings my entire childhood.

aqqindex:

Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo, Offices, 1967

I lived about 10 minutes away from “The Pyramids” as they were called locally throughout elementary and middle school.  I never conceived of them as anything other than strange office buildings my entire childhood.

(via builtfordistance)

nuclearharvest:

by Anna Taut

nuclearharvest:

by Anna Taut

(via duality0fman111)

Thu Sep 11

Tori Amos - Enjoy the Silence

The combination of Tori Amos and Depeche Mode gives me an intense number of feels.

(Source: kissforapizza, via hfml)

We are disturbed not by what happens to us, but by our thoughts about what happens to us. Epictetus (via thecalminside)

(via muthafuckinmichael)

fotojournalismus:

New York, 1983. Photos by Thomas Hoepker.

(via moarrrmagazine)

(via francfernandez)